Clare Crawley Reveals Sexual Abuse by a Priest at Her Catholic School

In July, Clare Crawley revealed that she is a childhood sexual abuse survivor, detailing how it impacted her adult relationships.

In a new interview, the Bachelor Nation alum is sharing more about her trauma.

The predator who targeted her as a child was seen as above reproach by her community.

He was a priest at her Catholic Church, and posed as a counselor to prey upon children like her.

On Thursday, September 30, Clare Crawley was a guest on Red Table Talk: The Estefans.

She spoke on this Facebook talk show on multiple topics, but she opened up about her previous revelation of being a CSA survivor.

“I grew up going to a Catholic school,” Clare said, “and I was the victim of a predator.”

“My parents looked at Catholic priests as,” Clare began, struggling momentarily to find the words.

She then explained: “They held them on a pedestal.”

Acknowledging with her hosts that her mother is of Mexican descent, Clare said that, culturally, this idea runs “very deep in our [family’s] roots.”

Gloria Estefan explained how vividly she understood Clare’s family’s mentality before that time.

“How could you not trust a priest?” she remarked.

She of course acknowledged that one is supposed to be able to trust a priest, not that this is always wise.

The priest’s role, Clare explained, was as a counselor for children at the school.

“My parents did the best they could,” she explained.

“And reached out for the resources they could at the time,” Clare recalled, “and sent me to this priest.”

Unfortunately, helping Clare’s mental and emotional development was the opposite of what the predator had in mind.

“I don’t think there was any counseling that was done,” Clare remarked grimly.

“It was a one-on-one time to be a predator,” she explained.

Sometimes, sexual predators are framed as otherwise “normal” people who were corrupted by positions of power.

This is a tempting narrative for some people, but often not the case.

Predators and aspiring predators are drawn to positions and professions of power where they can avoid consequences.

In July, Clare spoke about how being the victim of sexual abuse as a child impacted her adult life and relationships.

“My young adult years were spent in unhealthy relationships feeling unworthy of the good ones,” she admitted at the time.

Clare explained that she had undergone breast augmentation because, like so many CSA survivors, “I believed I wasn’t good enough.”

In some ways, society and culture serve as enablers of sexual abuse.

Many children lack the language to even explain what has happened, and may feel ashamed — as if the predator’s actions were their fault.

It is never the victim’s fault — not for being targeted, not for being abused, and not for not coming forward before they were ready.

Of course, much of the recent attention on Clare has not been about her survival story, but about her breakup with Dale Moss. 

“I hate that I even have to say this, but in response to all the questions that are coming my way right now…” Clare began on Instagram.

She wrote: “I’m choosing not to speak right now on the details of my relationship.”

Clare explained that she is not speaking yet “because at the end of the day anyone can put on an ACT.”

“Or,” she continued, “throw words together to form any narrative they want.”

Clare added: “What I will speak on is emotionally and physically I’m going through a lot.”

Clare has been through so much “with healing from my recent surgery still, and my mother being placed on hospice care now.”

“So my energy is focused on grieving, healing,” she emphasized.

“And,” Clare continued, “being present at home here in Sacramento while trying to share and help others going through similar life experiences as I’m sharing today.”

“I am just thankful for the people in my life who offer genuine unconditional love with no personal gain,” Clare affirmed.

“And,” she added, those who “stand by me through thick and thin.”

Clare concluded: “ESPECIALLY WHEN THE CAMERAS ARE OFF with no accolades. actions speak for themselves.”

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