Post pandemic Britons would rather go on holiday rather than see relatives

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The majority of people are in desperate need of a holiday, with those in Greater London eyeing up a summer getaway more than any other region, the poll commissioned by hard seltzer brand White Claw found.

Baby Boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964, are the most excited about seeing their family, while every generation except for  Gen Z, those born between 1997 and 2012, are looking forward to going to the pub more than the gym.

Socially starved Britons are looking forward to socialising no matter the weather, when restrictions ease.

The most acceptable weather condition to meet up with friends before the pandemic was warm and dry but a quarter of respondents said they would be happy to chat outdoors in snow, strong winds or heavy rain when the pandemic ends.

The coronavirus crisis has shifted people’s habits permanently with more than half surveyed agreeing they will continue to socialise outdoors more than they would have before the pandemic struck last March.

A spokeswoman for White Claw said: “Socialising outside is not set to slow down post-pandemic, with 55 percent of Brits surveyed agreeing that when restrictions finally ease, they would happily continue to socialise outdoors going forwards more than they would have pre-Covid.”

Women were more likely to socialise outside compared to men, while 73 percent of people aged 18 to 24 said they will continue to gather outdoors more than before.

The spokeswoman added: “Not only are we craving holidays, but our desperate need to socialise with loved ones means we’ll now accept inclement weather to socialise outdoors, such as snow, strong winds or heavy rain, even most post-pandemic, and Londoners are more prepared to do this than those in the more traditionally hardy regions further North.”

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